Category Archives: Age

JR West Develops Automatic Ramp for Wheelchair Passengers

The system automatically extends a stainless ramp when a train arrives at a station platform.
This is the first device in Japan that simultaneously eliminates any vertical or horizontal gap between the platform and the train door

Barrier Free Japan

From Jiji Press

November 17 2021

OSAKA – West Japan Railway Co said Wednesday that it has developed an automatic ramp system designed to help wheelchair users get on and off trains. The system automatically extends a stainless ramp when a train arrives at a station platform.

This is the first device in Japan that simultaneously eliminates any vertical or horizontal gap between the platform and the train door, according to the company, better known as JR West.

JR West plans to conduct demonstration tests until February next year, aiming to put it into practical use in a few years.

The ramp is about 3.6 meters wide and some 1.5 meters long. When a censor at a station detects that a train has stopped, the ramp installed at the end of the platform will automatically come out in about five seconds, causing no delay in the train schedule.

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Andrew Dilnot is right: the public needs a new story of social care

“…many of us have a view of social care as representing loss rather than gain, as something to be avoided, not something that could help us to maintain our wellbeing and life goals, these messages are just feeding the beast. They reinforce an association between social care and death – the ultimate fatalistic thought. And in the face of death we turn away for as long as we are able to.”

By Neil Crowther

It was fascinating listening to Andrew Dilnot at yesterday’s Treasury Select Committee on social care funding, talking not only about the detail of the government’s latest proposals, but crucially about the importance of winning media, political, and public support to increase investment to a level necessary to achieve the kind of support we might have reason to value.

Dilnot noted how the government’s funding proposals, the detail of which was published on Wednesday, amounted to the first time any significant increase in spending on social care has been committed by a government for 40 years, but that this fact and the inadequacies of the proposals pointed to how ‘social care simply hasn’t attracted political, public or media support proportionate to its needs…….so I do think the proposed settlement is inadequate, but that’s a problem that implies criticism of all of our institutions and we all need to…

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I Spent 44 Years Studying Retirement. Then I Retired.

When you have worked from home for 20+ years the transition to retirement is different.

the National Association of Senior & Specialty Move Managers® blog

“The Enigma of Arrival” is the title and theme of a novel by the Nobel laureate V.S. Naipaul. What is it about arrival that is mysterious? Simply that one’s imagination of a destination, even a place for which one has prepared and striven, will never quite be one’s eventual experience of the place.

I am now retired for a year and a half, and if anybody should have known what to expect in this new stage of life, it was me. I have made retirement the primary focus of my academic scholarship as a sociologist all the way back to my first published article in 1976. At that time, I told my mother that I was going to study aging, and she asked me across our generational gap, “What do you know about it?” It was a fair question.

So I learned. Through surveys and interviews, I have explored how…

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All I want is a good death. Is that too much to ask?

“We die in hospitals in the most unpleasant way, hooked up to tubes and machinery that unnecessarily delays the inevitable. Our lives may be prolonged slightly but the declining quality of life is hardly worth the price of suffering.”

Eye View

Like most Canadians, I’d like to die in my home surrounded by friends and family.

Or second best, a home-like setting like the lovely Kamloops Hospice House.  That peaceful setting is where my wife spent her last days as she was dying of cancer.

Kamloops Hospice House. image: CFJC Today

But contrary to Canadian’s wishes, only 15 per cent die at home.

More often we die in hospitals; more than comparable countries. Most Canadians, 61 percent, die in hospital. Far more than the Netherlands at 30 per cent. And although we like to boast about our health care system, only 20 per cent of Americans die in hospitals according to a report from the C.D. Howe Institute (Globe and Mail, Oct. 26, 2021).

We die in hospitals in the most unpleasant way, hooked up to tubes and machinery that unnecessarily delays the inevitable. Our lives may be prolonged slightly but…

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What’s Going to Happen to All the Crap I’ve Accumulated When I Die?

“We may be choosing cremation over burial these days, but self-storage units serve as the new cemeteries: hilltop monuments to our impoverished pasts, tributes to our heady successes, funerary urns holding all that will be left of us after we’re gone. I’ve come to think of them as shrines…”

the National Association of Senior & Specialty Move Managers® blog

All across America, we boomers are finding ourselves stuck with heirlooms and mementos that we can’t give away. By Sandy Hingston, Philly Magazine (October 2021).

You gather up a lot of flotsam and jetsam in a lifetime. What happens to all your stuff after you die? Illustration by Nathan Hackett

Not too long ago, we had guests over to the house — a rare event anymore, even as we all slowly reenter the World of Other People. The occasion was an annual picnic we host for relatives, back on again after a summer skipped because of COVID. As I welcomed the first arrivals in the living room, I felt compelled to apologize for all the crapola lining my bookcase shelves. I could see my niece and nephew taking in the array of ancient elementary-school art projects, nesting dolls, Rubik’s Cubes, animal carvings, music boxes and pieces of driftwood with a…

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Join the MorningStar Team in the Denver Area — Creating a True “Home” for Seniors

Ralph Waldo Emerson, the famous American essayist, lecturer, and philosopher is quoted as saying, “The purpose of life is not to be happy. It is to be useful, to be honorable, to be compassionate, and to have it make some difference that you have lived and lived well.”  We could not agree more. At the […]

Join the MorningStar Team in the Denver Area — Creating a True “Home” for Seniors

Reframing Ageing

Public perceptions of ageing, older age and demographic change

July 2021

Attempting to change narratives is often known as ‘reframing’: making
conscious and intentional choices about what to include – and what
not to include – in communications in order to influence how people
think, feel, and act on certain issues. The language we use matters
because it can influence public opinion, which can in turn influence
policy choices and decisions.
The current ‘dominant view’ of ageing and demographic change is
summarised in the table on page 6 of the report. This is derived from our literature review and discourse analysis, which explored how ageing was talked about and represented across different parts of society.
The ‘alternative view’, also summarised, has been developed
over several years of researching ageing and how people experience
later life. Many working in ageing already advocate for this view and
ascribe to it, however it is clearly at odds with the current dominant
view. The gap between these two views represents the reframing
challenge. The report explores this and how we create that shift from the
dominant view to the alternative view.

Read the report at Centre for Ageing Better source: Reframing-ageing-public-perceptions.pdf